Disc Herniations/Sciatica: Endoscopic Discectomy Mininally Invasive with or without Laser Decompression.

 

Spinal Stenosis/Spondylolisthesis: Endoscopic Decompression; Laminectomy with or without fusion; Coflex stabilization.

 

Degenerative Disc Disease Cervical or Lumbar: Disc Replacement surgery.

Surgical Treatments //

WHAT IS ENDOSCOPIC SPINE SURGERY?

 

  • Endoscopic spine surgery encompasses the use of a specialized minimally invasive instrument which contains a high definition optic camera and light system and a working portal which permits the use of other specialized instruments. The camera allows for direct visualization of the neurologic structures in comparison to most percutaneous techniques which do not permit the surgeon to directly visualize nerves. Instruments such as pituitaries, dissecting tools, and lasers allow the endoscopic surgeon to decompress and free spinal nerves.

WHAT TYPE OF SPINE SURGERY CONDITION CAN BE TREATED WITH ENDOSCOPIC SURGERY?

 

  • Disc Herniations: Patients with lumbar, thoracic, and cervical disc herniations are candidates for endoscopic spine surgery. Often patients with disc herniations suffer from arm or leg pain with or without neck and low back pain. The often difficult to treat “Far Lateral or Sub Articular” disc herniation is ideally suited for endoscopic techniques. Patients with recurrent disc herniations can also be treated with endoscopic spinal surgery.

  • Foraminal/Spinal Stenosis: Patients with arm or leg pain caused by a constriction of the nerve by bone spurs and/or disc herniations in the window or vertebral foramen are also ideally suited for endoscopic techniques.

  • Annular Tears: Patients with annular tears (disc tear) that cause both back and leg pain are also suited for endoscopic techniques that permit debridement of the tear with coblation (sealing) of the tear.

  • Back Pain:Patients with primarily back pain with or without leg pain who are candidates for spinal fusion can also have their fusion performed endoscopically. Alternatively, facet nerve ablations can be performed using the endoscope.

  • Disc Space Infections: Disc space infections that are unresponsive to traditional conservative treatment may also benefit from endoscopic techniques.

WHAT TYPE OF SPINE CONDITION CANNOT BE TREATED WITH ENDOSCOPIC SPINE SURGERY?

 

  • Conditions such as scoliosis, spine factures, and severe multi-level spinal stenosis are not ideal candidates for endoscopic spine surgery.

WHAT ARE THE ADVANTAGES OF ENDOSCOPIC SPINE SURGERY?

 

  • Endoscopic spine surgery has several advantages as compared to traditional spinal surgery. The surgery is often performed as an outpatient using local and intravenous sedation anesthesia. The incision is less than 1 cm in length. Patients can return to work usually with 5-14 days post operatively. If the endoscopic surgery does not alleviate the primary symptom(s), other more invasive procedures such as disc replacement or fusion can be performed at a later time.

WHAT ARE THE RISKS OF ENDOSCOPIC SPINE SURGERY?

 

  • Although a rare circumstance, as with spinal surgical procedures of any kind, complications can occur. Endoscopic surgery is performed around the spinal nerves. These surrounding nerve(s) could sustain a transient or permanent injury leading to pain, weakness, and/or numbness. An incidental durotomy or dural injury could lead to spinal fluid leakage. Injury to surrounding structures such as intestinal organs and/or vascular structures is possible but unlikey. Other risks such as infection and anesthetic risks (stroke, heart attack, blindness, allergic reaction, and others) can occur.

HOW IS ENDOSCOPIC SPINE SURGERY PERFORMED: WATCH THE VIDEOS OF THE SURGERY

 

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